Royal Ascot 2017

Royal Ascot 2016 Betting Guide, Odds & Tips

There are 30 races across the five-day Royal Ascot 2016 meeting which includes eight group ones and a further nine group races. Royal Ascot is one of the biggest horse racing betting opportunities in the UK and bookmakers will offer enhanced place terms, competitive pricing and lots of free bets and bonuses. Bettingexpert provide Royal Ascot tips every day for every race to give you an edge on all the racing.

Bet on the Royal Ascot 2016 at bet365

Royal Ascot Betting Odds & Promotions

Read our exclusive Royal Ascot betting tips every day to get an edge on the racing. With years of experience, you can trust our excellent tipster Stephen Harris to deliver profits throughout the week. As well as Royal Ascot betting tips, use our Royal Ascot guide to bring you the very best Royal Ascot betting odds and promotions each day.

Royal Ascot 2017 Betting Tips

Royal Ascot is the longest horse racing festival held in the UK with five days of glorious racing. It plays host to an incredible amount of group races each day with countless numbers of listed contests and fiercely competitive handicaps. With so much high class action, punters can take advantage of ample betting opportunities and make the bookies pay for an incredible week of racing.

Everyone has a Royal Ascot tip. Punters are generally familiar with the horses and have their favourites, but you can turn this into your advantage over the week by taking advantage of the value. So are you looking for Royal Ascot betting tips from a proven profitable racing expert and tipster? Our racing expert Stephen Harris will be posting a tip for each race of the festival, right throughout the week. Check Stephen's Royal Ascot betting tips every day of the festival, and also look out for predictions posted by the tipsters of the Bettingexpert community.

How to Bet on Royal Ascot 2017 Horse Racing

Royal Ascot Handicaps

There are numerous handicaps at Royal Ascot, usually although not exclusively after each showpiece race each day. Most handicap favourites are horses who have won on their last start or have been performing impressively throughout the season. It’s not just punters that notice these performances, it’s also the handicapper. As a result, horses who have won or placed in the weeks or months leading up to Royal Ascot may be subject to a rise in the handicap. Although each horse is different, many of these horses end up being poor value at Royal Ascot with so much money placed on these particular horses. As the bookmakers shorten and shorten these popular horses, you can take advantage of the lengthening odds on horses who have good form from last year or have performed well at the track before. These horses may have avoided being raised in the handicap and as a result can remain well-handicapped on older form which isn’t spotted by the majority of punters. Remember, any handicap with 16 or more runners pays four places, so always look for the each-way value. Some firms may even pay fifth place!

Royal Ascot Two Year-Old Races

As a general rule, horse racing trainers don’t have their horses fully tuned up to win on their debut, or even second run. Some trainers like to bring their horses along slowly, so don’t be put off if you see a horse with the form figures 41 or 21 and another horse with 11. If trainers have highlighted Royal Ascot with a certain horse, they may prep them to peak on the day of the race. This could offer another value angle, given a lot of punters like to bet on unbeaten horses, even though it doesn’t mean a great deal in terms of form. Aidan O’Brien is a trainer who likes to bring his horses along slightly slower. His horse Waterloo Bridge had form figures of 6321 before winning a Group Two at Ascot at 12/1.

Royal Ascot Jockeys

Royal Ascot 2015 saw the rise of Moore-O-Mania. Now retained by O’Brien, Moore was landing more and more winners and as a result his rides became over bet. Found is one such example from Royal Ascot 2015 where his mount probably returned at a shorter price than it should have. This opens up plenty of betting angles for punters, both win and each way at much better odds away from the popular options.  

Royal Ascot Risk Free Bets

Nearer to the start of Royal Ascot 2017 we'll post the very best risk free bets for Royal Ascot 2017.

Where to watch Royal Ascot 2017

If you’re not going to Royal Ascot 2017 there are numerous ways you can watch the racing. The most comprehensive way to watch Royal Ascot 2017 is with Racing UK. It’s a pay-per-view channel available online and on Freeview and it will give you access to all the build-up including tips from the experts at the racecourse as well as an in-depth review of the day’s racing. If you don’t want to pay to watch the racing, Channel 4 will begin their coverage from early afternoon each day and will show the live racing with plenty of chat and interviews to enjoy. Whilst it doesn’t have the betting focus of RUK, it’s a good alternative to watch. Finally, if you’re out and about, you can pop into your local betting shop which will show every race live.

Royal Ascot 2016 Fixtures & Times

Royal Ascot 2016 starts on Tuesday 14th June and races every day up to and including Saturday 18th June when Royal Ascot 2016 finishes. Royal Ascot race times are the same every single day. The first race begins at 2:30 and the last race is at 5:35 with six races per day.

Royal Ascot 2016 Betting Tips

Royal Ascot 2017 Ladies Day

Ladies day 2017 at Royal Ascot is Thursday 16th June. Ladies are encouraged to dress to impress with a best dressed competition taking part with attractive prizes to be won. A stylish hat, headpiece or fascinator is essential to standing out. Check out previous Royal Ascot hats, dresses and outfits to get inspiration for your Ascot outfit.

Royal Ascot Directions & Transport

Here are some helpful tips to aid your journey to Royal Ascot and make your day run as smoothly as possible. Ascot racecourse is in Berkshire and is nestled just to the east of Bracknell. If you’re travelling by road, the Ascot racecourse postcode is SL5 7JX. If you’re travelling by car, you can park in Car park 8 which will cost £30. If you’re travelling by train, the nearest station is Ascot and it’s just a seven-minute walk from the racecourse. There are regular trains to Ascot from Reading which take 27 minutes and Waterloo which takes 52 minutes. If you happen to be travelling by helicopter, there is a landing facility at Royal Ascot racecourse.

Royal Ascot 2017 Tickets

There is still time to buy your Royal Ascot tickets but be quick as some tickets are sure to sell out soon. A typical Royal Ascot ticket in the Windsor Enclosure will cost around £35 whilst tickets in the Queen Anne Enclosure will cost upwards of £75. If you fancy upgrading your Queen Anne ticket to include the Furlong Club, that will cost you near £200 per person which includes a private decked terrace, extra seating and a complimentary race card.

Royal Ascot Enclosures

If you’re thinking about going to Royal Ascot 2017 you are going to need to know which enclosure to choose. Bettingexpert gives you a thorough rundown to help you make your decision on which Royal Ascot enclosure to choose for your big day.

Royal Ascot Windsor Enclosure

The Royal Ascot Windsor Enclosure is the equivalent of the ‘Silver Ring’ to most other racecourses. Based a couple of furlongs away from the main grandstand, the Windsor Enclosure is a more relaxed way to enjoy the racing. Racegoers are encouraged to dress smart but there is no formal dress code in place except that replica sports shirts are not permitted. Picnics are allowed but be careful as Royal Ascot has a strict alcohol policy. Each adult is only permitted to bring one bottle of sparkling wine or champagne to accompany their picnic.  

Royal Ascot Queen Anne Enclosure

The Royal Ascot Queen Anne Enclosure is the equivalent of the ‘Grandstand Enclosure’ at most other racecourses. The Queen Anne Enclosure gives you access to the Pre-Parade and Parade Rings as well as a first class view of all the racing. If you’re in the Queen Anne Enclosure be sure you dress to impress. Royal Ascot enforces a strict formal dress code policy. Gentlemen must wear a matching suit with a shirt and tie, no top hat is required! For ladies it’s a little more thorough. Ladies must wear a hat, headpiece of fascinator at all times. No strapless or sheer strap dresses or tops are permitted. Trousers must be full length and worn with a top that adheres to the above guidelines. Midriffs must be covered and finally shorts are not permitted. Good luck ladies! For children, boys aged 13-16 should wear a suit or jacket with a tie. Boys aged 12 or under are not required to wear a jacket or tie. Smart summer dresses are suggested for girls aged 17 or under and hats, headpieces and fascinators are not compulsory.  

Royal Ascot Royal Enclosure

The Royal Ascot Royal Enclosure is by invitation only. You cannot buy tickets for this enclosure and is the only enclosure in the whole of the UK to be invitation only. Members of the Royal Ascot Royal Enclosure can invite guests but without an invitation from a member of the Royal Enclosure, you will not be able to access this stand. If you are attending the Royal Enclosure, you must follow the strict dress code. Gentlemen must wear an either black or grey morning dress which must include a waistcoat and tie, a black or grey top hot and plain black shoes. Ladies are required to wear formal daywear which is defined as follows: a dress or skirt that is of modest length, jackets and pashminas may be worn, trouser suits are welcome if they are of matching material and colour and hats must be worn. Children aged 10-17 should adhere to the ladies and gentlemen dress code. Overseas visitors are welcome to wear their national dress. Serving military are welcome to wear their service dress or equivalent.

Royal Ascot Dress Code

Windsor Enclosure

There is no dress code in the Windsor Enclosure. Replica sports clothing is not permitted and this policy will be strictly enforced so don’t be caught out. Racegoers are encouraged to dress smartly but this is at your discretion. Hats, fascinators and headpieces are not compulsory.

Queen Anne Enclosure

Gentlemen must wear a matching suit with a shirt and tie, no top hat is required! For ladies it’s a little more thorough. Ladies must wear a hat, headpiece of fascinator at all times. No strapless or sheer strap dresses or tops are permitted. Trousers must be full length and worn with a top that adheres to the above guidelines. Midriffs must be covered and finally shorts are not permitted. Good luck ladies! For children, boys aged 13-16 should wear a suit or jacket with a tie. Boys aged 12 or under are not required to wear a jacket or tie. Smart summer dresses are suggested for girls aged 17 or under and hats, headpieces and fascinators are not compulsory.  

Royal Enclosure

Gentlemen must wear an either black or grey morning dress which must include a waistcoat and tie, a black or grey top hot and plain black shoes. Ladies are required to wear formal daywear which is defined as follows: a dress or skirt that is of modest length, jackets and pashminas may be worn, trouser suits are welcome if they are of matching material and colour and hats must be worn. Children aged 10-17 should adhere to the ladies and gentlemen dress code. Overseas visitors are welcome to wear their national dress. Serving military are welcome to wear their service dress or equivalent.

Royal Ascot 2016 Betting Tips

 

The History Of Royal Ascot

As one would expect the history of the Royal meeting began with the Monarchy way back in 1711 at a time when horse racing was becoming very fashionable with the rich. It was Queen Ann herself that purchased the land adjacent to Windsor Castle that has now evolved into the most modern of 21st century racecourses.

Before long race meetings were taking place, which became very popular with racehorse owners due to the social benefits that were on offer from Royalty at the time. It was not long before the Ascot meeting became the most important of its type among the landed aristocracy, with its popularity leading to the first four-day festival in 1768.

The precise origins of the Royal Meeting are unclear, as the event evolved from the first four-day meeting that took place in 1768. The meeting as it’s known today only really started to take shape with the introduction of the Gold Cup in 1807. Royal Ascot was the only race meeting held at Ascot until 1939 (quite remarkable but shows how racing was purely for Royalty and the upper-classes, not a commercial venture or one that needed the support of the "common man").

Modern Royal Ascot

These days of course Royal Ascot has become the most prestigious horse racing meeting in the country with Royalty in attendance daily, and a sold-out crowd guaranteed from one year to the next, many of course more interested in the fashion, hats and hob-nobbing with the great and the good in the Royal Enclosure (still one of the most sought after invitations in this more meritocratic age).

The meeting hosts 9 of the 32 Group One races held in the UK each year, with the "Blue Riband" being the famous Ascot Gold Cup, raced on Ladies Day, and bringing together the greatest stayers from several generations every year. In 2009, Yeats, ridden by Johnny Murtagh and trained by Aidan O'Brien, won his fourth consecutive Gold Cup – a magnificent achievement, and one that is unlikely to be repeated, but this year has a wide open look to it with no standout contender.

In 2011, Ascot celebrated its tercentenary and staged the inaugural QIPCO British Champions Day, now the climax to the European flat racing season (controversially staged at the end of the season, though fortunately the first running’s have seen unusually nice weather and good crowds), and last year Ascot was at the heart of the country’s celebrations to mark The Queen’s Diamond Jubilee, with the Golden Jubilee Stakes renamed the Diamond Jubilee Stakes and won (narrowly and controversially) by the now retired Australian super-mare, Black Caviar.

In 2012 the world’s four top horses on official ratings ran at Ascot, something no other venue could claim and king of them all, of course, was the mighty Frankel. He retired victorious and unbeaten in 14 runs after the Champion Stakes, having competed at two, three and four at Ascot – five wins in all at the Berkshire track including two at Royal Ascot and two on British Champions Day. This season lacks the star quality of a Black Caviar or a Frankel, but the overall standard makes this a meeting that no true enthusiast of the sport can miss.

Many have taken time to warm to the "new" grandstand, and on the smaller days it can resemble a vast, cold airport terminal, staffed by officious jobsworths who deny access to areas depending on one's attire.

But for the Royal meeting, it serves its purpose perfectly, allowing far more ease of movement when the crowd is at capacity and the viewing is now as good as it gets (after many initial problems when it was impossible to see or hear anything apart from some chap’s top hat in front of you).

The Course and Facilities for Punters

Ascot is a right-handed galloping track with a testing uphill finish. There is a straight mile - used for races such as the Queen Anne - and a round mile - used for contests like the St James's Palace. The longest race at Royal Ascot, and indeed of the Flat season, is the Queen Alexandra Stakes, which is run over 2m5½f. A vast range of hot and cold refreshments are available from a number of hospitality areas and restaurants in the Grandstand and Silver Ring (although bringing a picnic usually offers the better option for all "value" seekers.

Royal Enclosure and Grandstand admission ticket holders can visit the parade ring located directly behind the Grandstand, however there is no access to the parade ring from the Silver Ring or Heath Enclosure. The main places to bet are at one of the Totepool windows or with the bookmakers, who are located in the betting ring in front of the stands in the Grandstand admission areas, Silver Ring and Heath Enclosures.

The strength of the Ascot ring is unrivalled, with every major bookmaker in attendance and the competition for the punters money intense. Like everywhere, the main focus of betting is now away from the track on the betting exchanges, and many layers complain that the average bet asked for by the social public crowd is 50p each-way, but on the rails the action is still fast and lumpy. This is one of the few rings where getting a bet of any size is not a problem, with the well established players keen to take on punters at a course where they traditionally get their share of "results".

The numerous car parks open from 9am and the course opens at 10.30am each day, and the shrewder racegoers will aim to be there early to avoid the horrific traffic congestion that amasses in the high street every year...oh and don't try to leave until about 7pm either! The hassles aside, the Royal meeting is a fantastic experience and well worth getting to at least once in a lifetime.